6/6/10

Shakshuka

Shakshuka. Isn't that a fun word to say? But did you know it's even a more fun dish to eat? This is actually an Israeli dish: the basic idea is to cook eggs (to a soft point) in some tomatoes. You can do it either on a stove top or in the oven.

But of course I had to add a few of my own twists to the basic recipe.


Ingredients for 1

1 teaspoon oil
1/4 red onion, chopped
1 can fire roasted tomatoes
1-2 tablespoons garlic scape pesto
2 eggs
cilantro to garnish



Directions
1. In a non stick pan (I use a green pan), heat the oil. Add onions and saute till they are translucent.
2. Add tomatoes and pesto and simmer for a few minutes.
3. Make two indentations in the sauce and carefully break the eggs into them. Cover and cook for a few minutes till the egg whites are cooked through, but the yolks are still soft.




You can eat the dish straight out of the pan! Don't forget to garnish with cilantro! Break the eggs, mix them with tomatoes and pesto and use a few slices of bread for dunking.



Other things you might want to add to this dish: roasted peppers, cheese, garlic, and spices.



But really, the dish was great as is.

20 comments:

Lauren (Healthy Delicious) said...

yum! I've been seeing a few versions of this lately and they all look so good! I love how you added pesto to it.

Sylvie said...

This looks so good! I'd use an entire baguette to eat this.

Heavenly Housewife said...

My dad used to make a version of this for us when my sisters and I were little girls. I love it.
Hope you are having a great weekend.
*kisses* HH

Velva said...

This is beautiful. What a healthy way to enjoy eggs. Served up with crusty buttered bread this would be perfect.

Jenn (Jenn's Menu and Lifestyle Blog) said...

That looks fabulous! I love runny yolks.

Jenn

Nick (Macheesmo) said...

This is one of my favorite recipes... favorite ways to eat eggs.

I love that you can just serve it in the pan!

Nice work Olga!

Esi said...

This is one of my favorite ways to eat eggs. Love the pesto addition.

grace said...

excellent use for your pesto, olga! and you're right--shakshuka is fun to say and type and make and eat--WIN! :)

Korky's Mom said...

Love love love shakshuka. Your dish looks fantastic!

Fernando said...

I've tried this recipe (well, not the exact recipe, but the basic one) twice and found that I like it better when I just cook them separately and then eat them together.

Basically, I make the tomato sauce and poach the eggs in water for 4 minutes (until the whites are set but the yolk is still runny) and then I serve over toasted English muffins topped with bacon. It's basically eggs Benedict but you use the tomato instead of the hollandaise and the bacon instead of the ham (Canadian Bacon).

iEatDC said...

It's so funny, I had never heard of shakshouka and then two other blogs I read made it recently. Looks totally up my alley, can't wait to try it.

5 Star Foodie said...

I've heard of this dish but haven't tried or made it yet. Great idea to add the garlic scape pesto!

dining room set said...

You did it perfectly! I like the eggs on the top! They formed perfectly.

BlueToYou said...

looks beautiful! there's another name for the dish: eggs in pergatory.
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&rlz=1C1CHFX_enUS378US378&&sa=X&ei=X0cOTJWQDIS0lQfMsPhs&ved=0CBkQvwUoAQ&q=eggs+in+purgatory&spell=1

Carolyn Jung said...

I do love the name. It just rolls off the tongue with such rhythm that you just feel like shaking your hips when you say it out loud. ;)

Lori said...

This looks really great! I need to get more creative with my eggs. It has taken me a while to get around to the runny yolk, but I'm learning to love it.

d said...

This is by no means an israeli dish. Shakshuka is an arabic word and it's been eaten in the Middle East for centuries. Just wanted to clarify.

Loul@ said...

That's what we eat on saturday evening usually. We really like this. Good recipe and nice pictures!

Christina S. said...

If we want to be ex

Sarah S. said...

If we want to be exact, it's a Tunisian dish. Just as its made its way throughout the Middle East and is now considered a Middle Eastern dish, the Tunisian Jews brought it to Israeli and it's now one of our staple foods. Hence, Israeli dish. Also, Shakshuka (שקשוקה) is a word in Hebrew, meaning "mixed up". I understand it has a similar meaning in Arabic :)